How coffee is harvested

Harvesting coffee for one region can take four to five months. Peak activity lasts 1–2 months and falls in time at the midpoint of harvest, when the berry demonstrates the best quality indicators. If only ripe berries are harvested and if properly processed after harvest, this will be the best batch of the entire crop.Harvesting coffee for one region can take four to five months. Peak activity lasts 1–2 months and falls in time at the midpoint of harvest, when the berry demonstrates the best quality indicators. If only ripe berries are harvested and if properly processed after harvest, this will be the best batch of the entire crop.

Harvesting in the mountains of Mexico. Central America and Colombia are not easy. The picker here picks at least 30-50 kilograms of berries per day, under ideal conditions 100 kilograms. What’s more, harvest time varies with height and temperature conditions – these factors affect the quality of coffee from different regions.

In Central America, harvesting begins at lower altitudes in September for less expensive coffees. The coffee, which grows at higher altitudes, has better quality and more pronounced sourness, is harvested from December to January.

In Colombia, coffee can be harvested all year round, depending on the region. However, there are usually two harvesting seasons. The main season, during which up to 70% of the crop is harvested, lasts from October to December; the second season, called mitaka in Colombia, runs from April to May. However, in some regions of the country, everything is exactly the opposite.